Thilo HAGEN

Associate Professor

Affiliations

Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS.
Supervisor, NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS).

Education

Degree and Institution Year(s)
M.D. Humboldt University Berlin 1996

Professional Experience

Position and Institute Year(s)
Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS 2013 – present
Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS 2007 – 2013
Assistant Professor, Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, University of Nottingham, UK 2003 – 2007
Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, UK 2001 – 2003
Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Neurology Centre of Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline, UK 2000 – 2001
Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Division of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, USA 1998 – 2000
Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Departments of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA 1996 – 1998

Research Interest

* Cellular signaling and energy metabolism
* Cellular stress response
* Novel therapeutic approaches for obesity and cancer

Selected Publications

  1. CY Tan, T Hagen. Post-translational regulation of mTOR complex 1 in hypoxia and reoxygenation. Cell Signal 25:1235-44 (2013).

  2. RW Wong, T Hagen. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent regulation of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) transcription in hypoxia. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 433:40-6 (2013).

  3. CY Tan, T Hagen. Destabilization of CDC6 upon DNA damage is dependent on neddylation but independent of Cullin E3 ligases. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 45:1489-1498 (2013).

  4. SY Hong, T Hagen. Multiple myeloma Leu167Ile (c.499C>A) mutation prevents XBP1 mRNA splicing. Br J Haematol 161:898-901 (2013).

  5. CY Tan, T Hagen. mTORC1 Dependent Regulation of REDD1 Protein Stability. PLoS One 8:e63970 (2013).

  6. L Cordero-Espinoza, T Hagen. Increased concentrations of Fructose-2,6-bisphosphate contribute to the Warburg effect in PTEN-deficient cells. J Biol Chem 288:36020-8 (2013).