Barry HALLIWELL

Senior Advisor to the President, NUS
Tan Chin Tuan Centennial Professor
Chairman of the Biomedical Research Council (BMRC), A*Star

+65 6516 6663
bchbh@nus.edu.sg

Affiliations

Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS
Senior Advisor to the President, NUS
Tan Chin Tuan Centennial Professor
Chairman of the Biomedical Research Council (BMRC), A*Star
Programme Leader, Neurobiology/Ageing Research Programme

Education

Degree and Institution Year(s)
University of Oxford, England (St. Catherine’s College)
B.A. (first-class honours), Biochemistry
Awarded the Rose Prize for the best finals papers of any candidate in biological science
1971
University of Oxford, England
D.Phil. Biochemistry (Biochemistry of Plants)
1973
University of London, England
D.Sc. in “The Biochemistry of Free Radical Reactions in Animal and Plant Systems”
1986

Professional Experience

Position and Institute Year(s)
Senior Advisor to the President, NUS Jun 2015-Present
Tan Chin Tuan Centennial Professor, NUS 2006-Present
Programme Leader, Neurobiology/Ageing Research Programme 2001–Present
Deputy President (in charge of Research and Technology), NUS Mar 2006–May 2015
Executive Director, NUS Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS) 2003–2008
Head of the Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS 2000–2007
Deputy Director, Office of Life Sciences (OLS), NUS 2001–2003
Senior Associate Dean with responsibility for Life Sciences,
Office of Research and Graduate Education (ORE), NUS
2001
Visiting Professor of Biochemistry 1988–2000
Professor of Medical Biochemistry in the Division of Pharmacology, University of London, King’s College 1988–2000
Reader in Biochemistry, University of London, King’s College Oct 1985–Sep 1988
Lister Institute Research Fellow in Preventive Medicine (five-year research fellowship) Oct 1983–Sep 1988
Lecturer in Biochemistry, University of London, King’s College
(Granted tenure Feb 1977, passed efficiency bar Mar 1982)
Nov 1974–Sep 1985
Lecturer in Biochemistry Portsmouth Polytechnic (Now University of Portsmouth) Sep 1973–Nov 1974
Research Fellow in Biochemistry St. Cross College, Oxford Oct 1971–Sep 1973
Visiting Research Professor in Internal Medicine and Biochemistry, Divisions of Cardiology and Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, USA Jan 1995–Oct 1999

Biodata

Professor Barry Halliwell is the Senior Advisor to the President at the National University of Singapore.

Professor Halliwell graduated from the University of Oxford with BA (1st class) and D.Phil degrees. He holds a D.Sc degree from the University of London. He was a faculty member with the University of London, King's College from 1974 to 2000 and held a prestigious Lister Institute Research fellowship. From 1995 to 1999, he was a Visiting Research Professor of Internal Medicine and Biochemistry with the University of California, School of Medicine, Divisions of Cardiology and Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine. Professor Halliwell was a Visiting Professor of Biochemistry to NUS from 1998 to 2000. He was Head of the University's Department of Biochemistry from 2000 to 2007 and was Deputy Director, Office of Life Sciences from 2001 to 2003. From 2003 to September 2008, he was Executive Director of the NUS Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering. From Mar 2006 to May 2015, he was the Deputy President (Research and Technology) at NUS.

An internationally-acclaimed biochemist, Professor Halliwell is known especially for his seminal work on the role of free radicals and antioxidants in biological systems. The Thomson Reuters lists Professor Halliwell as one of the world’s most highly-cited researchers in Biology and Biochemistry and his Hirsch Index is 145. ResearcherID

His book Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine published by Oxford University Press, and now in its fifth edition, is regarded worldwide as an authoritative text in the field. He was awarded the "Lifetime Achievement Award" by the Society for Free Radical Biology and Medicine in the USA for overall sustained excellence in the field.

His research focuses on the role of free radicals and antioxidants in human disease, particularly Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders. His interest in identifying the most important antioxidants in the human diet and in developing novel antioxidants has critical bearing on treating human diseases and understanding how diet might cause or prevent them.

Professor Halliwell is a member of several editorial boards including FEBS Letters, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications and Antioxidants and Redox Signaling. He has been a lead speaker at Gordon Conferences and other prestigious events worldwide and is a member of several expert advisory panels to leading universities, companies and government agencies.

Research Interests

Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cell injury and death in human disease (especially cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease) and in response to toxins. Antioxidants in nutrition, health and disease. Natural and synthetic antioxidants as therapeutic agents. Mechanism of ageing and age-related disease as studied using the Caenorhabditis elegans model.

Current Projects:
  1. The use of biomarkers of oxidative damage to lipids, DNA and proteins in the human body to identify important antioxidants, and their optimal intakes.
  2. Molecular nutrition – the mechanisms by which diet affects the risk of disease development.
  3. The role of transition metal ions as promoters of oxygen radical reactions in vitro and in vivo, with particular reference to inflammatory joint disease, leukaemia, hepatic failure, neuro¬degenerative diseases, reoxygenation injury, atherosclerosis and “metal overload” diseases such as Wilson’s disease and idiopathic haemochromatosis.
  4. The design and testing of drugs that prevent oxidative damage and their use as potential therapeutic agents. Development of screening tests for antioxidant activity.
  5. The chemical nature of the antioxidants present in vivo.
  6. Methods for the specific detection of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in vivo and their application to human disease, particularly stroke and neuro¬degenerative diseases.
  7. Ageing in humans and in the nematode C. elegans

Selected Publications

  1. Halliwell B and Gutteridge JMC. (2015) Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine. Clarendon Press, Oxford (fifth edition), UK.

  2. Halliwell B. (2011) Free radicals and antioxidants: - quo vadis? Trends Pharmacol Sci. 32, 125-130

  3. Ranjan, M, Gruber J, Ng LF, Halliwell B (2013) Repression of the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin antioxidant system does not shorten life span but causes reduced fitness in C.elegans. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 63C, 381-389.

  4. Seet RC, Loke WM, Khoo CM, Chew SE, Chong WL, Quek AM, Lim EC, Halliwell B (2012) Acute effects of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance and arterial stiffness in young adults. Atherosclerosis 224, 195-200.

  5. Gruber J, Ng LF, Fong S, Wong YT, Koh SA, Chen CB, Shui G, Cheong WF, Schaffer S, Wenk S, Halliwell B (2011) Mitochondrial changes in ageing Caenorhabditis elegans – what do we learn from superoxide dismutase knockouts? PLoS One 6, e19444